Category Archives: Botany

Here be Giants!

At Nymans you can enjoy some exotic species of plants that rather look down their noses at our native counterparts. All hail from the region known as Macronesia which includes Madeira, the Azores, the Canary Islands and the Cape Verdes. They have all evolved into giants.

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Geranium maderense

The above Geranium is superficially like our own ankle-high Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum) but this one grows to over a metre tall and up to 2 metres wide.

The dramatic Echium pictured below is in the family Boraginaceae which means it is related to the herb borage, forget-me-nots, and sometime bedding plant Echium vulgare, all of which are dwarfed by this 3m flower spike. This plant will flower in its second or third year after which it will set profuse quantities of seed, then die.

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Echium pininiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our native flora boasts a few Spurges (Euphorbias) the largest of which would be shade-loving Euphorbia amygdalloides at half a metre tall. The sun-loving giant Euphorbia (pictured below) reaches over 2m tall and 3m wide at Nymans. It is a hybrid between two large growing Macronesian species, E.mellifera and E. stygiana, both of which make good garden plants themselves.

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Euphorbia x pasteurii

All these plants can be grown successfully outdoors in the milder parts of the U.K. Echium pininiana seedlings may need protection through the winter. Or simply come and enjoy them and other plant delights at Nymans.

Author: Jon Keen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Botany, Half-hardies, Macronesia, Perennials, Plant collections, Plants and Planting, Uncategorized

Tulip Madness and other notes!

 

Now that spring has sprung, the garden is in full swing with the grass growing rapidly shortly followed by the weeds. We have been busy planting the last of the trees, shrubs and herbaceous perennials until the autumn. These have included additions to the prairie beds; Sedum ‘Indian Chief’, Knautia macedonica tied together by the dwarf grass Deschampsia ‘Pixie Fountain’. A number of rare unusual trees and shrubs have also been added to our collection such as Rhododendron ‘Susan’ named after Susan de Vesci daughter of the Countess of Rosse.

Sedum carpark

Sedum ‘Indian Chief’

The Sunk Garden in the heart of the garden is in full flower at the moment with the dark purple/crimson flowers of Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’ complemented by the subtle green/pink of Tulipa ‘Greenland’. This will be followed by an injection of colour later in the year when the summer display is planted, but before that you will be able to see Germanic Iris and Cosmos ‘Chocomocha’ jousting for pride of place.

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Tulipa ‘Greenland’ complemented by Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’

The stars of the show at Nymans at the moment must be the Tulips with the burnt colours of T. ‘Cario’ and T. ‘Orange Dynasty’ on the tropical terrace with the sweet smell of honey drifting across from Euphorbia mellifera and the towering ruins as a back drop.

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Tulipa ‘Cario’ with the back drop of tropical foliage

 

Just across to the main lawn in the aptly named Ivy bed which holds in a vibrant display of the royal purple of T. ‘Negrita’ and fiery orange of T. ‘Annie Schlider’.

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Tulipa ‘Negrita’ and Tulipa  ‘Annie Schlider’ in the Ivy Bed

The Tulip bombardment starts before you even enter Nymans when you are dazzled and wowed by the flamboyant and exciting swathes of T.’Sonnet’, T. ‘Dom Pedro’ and T. ‘Night Rider’ all dark and moody colours.

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Tulips at the entrance to Nymans

 

This is a complete contrast to the entrance to the Pinetum which sees the tall orange T. ‘El Nino’ amid the pristine white of T. ‘Hakuun’ with the backdrop of green from the Pinetum.

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Tulipa ‘El Nino’

Stephen Herrington – Head Gardener

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Filed under Botany, Garden History, Perennials, Plant collections, Plants and Planting

The Harold Comber Collection

We are very proud to announce that Nymans Estate has been awarded Plant Heritage status for its Harold Comber Collection. Harold Comber was the son of the first Head Gardener, James Comber, and he collected plants in the Andes and Tasmania in the mid-1920’s.

Harold Comber

Harold Comber

The collection consists of 60 taxa that are either the original plants he collected, or propagated from those originals. His legacy plays an important role at Nymans as we endeavour to maintain the collection as well as add to it.

Chilean Border - August 2013 (2)

Desfontainea spinosa

A form of Desfontainea (pictured above) was collected by Harold in Chile and it is our job to make sure we propagate such plants so they can always be seen at Nymans, and also to make available a stock of such plants to the wider horticultural community.

Myrceugenia leptospermoides 3

Myrceugenia leptospermoides

We also aim to build on this legacy by introducing newly collected plants from these countries. The Chilean plant above came to us via Martin Gardiner of Edinburgh Botanic Garden. This plant is endangered in it’s native habitat.

Weinmannia trichosperma 2

Weinmannia trichosperma

Weinmannia is another Chilean plant, rare in cultivation, that thrives in the shelter of our Walled Garden. Last year we created a new border for Chilean plants in the Walled Garden and we have some new plants to add  to our collection this year including Escallonia x stricta ‘Harold Comber’ and Luma apiculata ‘Nana’ which was a gift from Plant Heritage.

Jon Keen, Gardener.

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Filed under Botany, Chilean Plants, Garden History, Plant collections, Plants and Planting, Tasmanian Plants, Uncategorized

Wandering Wisterias

In late May and early June when the sun is out, you can often smell the sweet perfume of wisteria at Nymans. Wisterias originate from China, Japan and the eastern United States. Depending on the species, they twine either clockwise or anti-clockwise and have long flower heads.

Wisteria sinensis 'Alba' at the end of the potting shed. A white form with a delicate perfume and long flower heads.

Wisteria sinensis ‘Alba’ at the end of the potting shed. A white form with a delicate perfume and long flower heads.

 Wisterias have played an important part in the history of Nymans. The Japanese exhibition in London in 1903 started the fashion and Nymans was no exception. Ludwig Messel built the pergola by the croquet lawn  where they would have room to spread. One variety is Wisteria floribunda multijuga (syn.m.macrobotrys). This variety carries extremely long flower heads often up to a metre in length. 

Wisterias on the pergola. There are at least three different varieties along the whole length.

Wisterias on the pergola. There are at least three different varieties along the whole length.

Although some of the original plants may still exist at Nymans, there are some varieties where the origins are not known as records were lost in the fire of 1947. Some varieties also suffered in the storm of 1987 when the original pergola had to be demolished.

We are often asked about the care and maintenace of these striking plants. To prune, cut the current seaons long growth back to 5-6 buds from the base. This helps to prevent tangling and twining around other shoots. In February reduce the same growths back to 2 buds. This maintains healthy spurs and encourages larger flowers.

Wisteria sinensis. the variety in the wall garden is not known.The sheltered position means it is often the first to flower in the garden.

Wisteria sinensis. The variety in the wall garden is not known.The sheltered position means it is often the first to flower in the garden.

Today the wisterias at Nymans form a magnificent spectacle- we hope you enjoy their delicate fragrance and striking blooms as much as we do.

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Workin’ On The Wild Side

Every February the garden team escapes from the lawns and borders of the formal garden and heads off into the woods and the wild garden to coppice hazel (Corylus avellana). Ditching secateurs and spades we take up pruning saws and loppers to cut hundreds of pea-sticks which we’ll use as plant supports in our garden borders; hazel  branches are the ideal material .

Volunteer Wendy cutting pea-sticks

Volunteer Wendy cutting pea-sticks

So how do we coppice a pea-stick? Coppicing is a traditional term for cutting a tree or shrub down to ground level, or a low framework, in order to let the plant re-generate. The branches are naturally fan-shaped and with a little pruning to size are perfect for peas to grow through, hence the name, but can also be used as natural plant supports for tall annual and perennial plants in the border. Look-out for future blogs where you will see us placing the pea-sticks in the borders.

 Wendy with freshly cut pea-stick

Wendy with freshly cut pea-stick

This year we have the benefit of a new battery-powered chainsaw. This is much less noisy than a petrol chainsaw and less disruptive to the tranquility of the woodland setting so much so that while we were there we enjoyed the cries of two buzzards circling overhead and the occasional rat-a-tat-tat-ing of a woodpecker. 

The chainsaw doesn’t use forest fuels or emit any fumes and in future we’re hoping to re-charge it with solar panels as we already do with our battery-powered hedge-trimmers. . Nor is there any waste created because any material the Garden Team cannot use as  pea-sticks will be taken up by the Woods Team to make all manner of products in their workshop. Woodland products are available to buy from the Plant Centre all year round and surplus pea-sticks  are available from spring onwards.

Coppicing Hazel with a battery powered chainsaw.

Coppicing Hazel with a battery powered chainsaw.

Another benefit of coppicing is that it lets light into the forest floor providing an opportunity for our native flora to flourish. You can expect to see primroses (Primula vulgaris), celandine (Ficaria verna), wood spurge (Euphorbia amygdaloides) and our coveted English bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) re-colonise the ground as the hazel re-generates. It’ll be at least seven years before we return to this same spot in the woods to repeat the cycle.

Rest and recuperation for staff and volunteers.

Rest and recuperation for staff and volunteers.

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Filed under Botany, Garden History, Garden jobs, Plants and Planting, Winter interest

Rose Garden Re-Boot

The Rose Garden at Nymans, as seen in 2007

The Rose Garden at Nymans, as seen in 2007

The Rose Garden here at Nymans is no doubt one of the important feature areas of the garden, but it is also a part of the garden that has been constantly changing and evolving over the years. But why write a blog now about an area that was at its best back in the height of Summer, I hear you ask? Well, this year is no different in terms of the continued development of the Rose Garden and we’d like to talk you through some of the latest tweaks and changes that are happening here right now, as well as some of the history of this part of the garden and how that affects our decisions today. If you have roses in your own garden we’ll also give you a few hints and tips about what to do with them at this time of year. When should you prune? What should you do with your climbers? Read on for more advice below…..

The then latest incarnation of the Rose Garden being officially opened back in the early 1990's, overseen by family member Alistair Buchanan.

The then latest incarnation of the Rose Garden being officially opened back in the early 1990’s, overseen by family member Alistair Buchanan.

The story of roses at Nymans began as an early major plant collection that was started in the 1920s. Consisting of old roses, this collection was planted in a rose garden, originally called the Tank Garden (because of the water tank in the centre) adjacent to some Shrub Houses, near where our nursery now resides. This area was a former frameyard and the layout was planned by Maud Messel. Maud and her husband Leonard Messel collected the roses from nurseries, neighbours and friends, to form a large, important collection of early, historic roses, some also coming as gifts from gardens in England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and France. This plant collection was added to between 1949 and 1950 again by Maud with the help of James Comber, the first head gardener at Nymans.

Maud Messel (1875 - 1960)

Maud Messel
(1875 – 1960)

The next step in the development of the Rose Garden came in the 1960s when Leonard and Maud’s daughter Lady Anne Rosse redesigned the planting with help from Graham Stuart Thomas, an English horticulturalist and garden designer, best known for his work with roses, his restoration and stewardship of over 100 National Trust gardens and for writing 19 books on gardening. In the early 1990’s the Rose Garden was again re-designed, this time by Dutch garden designer and Chelsea medal winner Isabelle van Groeningen. Her design ethos was to create a small, enclosed intimate cottage-style garden. This was an important part of the Nymans history as the Rose Garden suddenly became the first area of the garden to be designed by a non-family member. The new design considerably reduced the size of the original garden. The beds you see today filled with the likes of Salvias, Fuchsias and Hydrangeas on the outside of the surrounding yew hedge, used to be contained within the Rose Garden itself. The old tank in the centre was replaced by a bronze fountain, in the form of a rose, designed by Vivien Rhys Pryce, an English sculptor. At this time a decision was also made to remove Miss Muriel’s Rockery, which was located in the centre of the previous incarnation of the Rose Garden but was in very poor condition.

The Rose Garden being completely re-designed back in 1992

The Rose Garden being completely re-designed back in 1992

The fountain sculpture doing what is does best

The fountain sculpture doing what is does best

Over the last couple of weeks we have been making continued steps to improve the Rose Garden for our visitors while also making sure we retain the historical importance of the various changes that the area has gone through over the years. One decision we have made is to increase the edge planting in here, meaning that the Rose Garden doesn’t just contain roses, but also other suitable plants as well. We have chosen cottage garden-style plants that will extend the interest in colours that will sit harmoniously with the palette of the roses themselves. Already present were Nepeta faasenii (which replaced the ‘Six Hills Giant’ variety that was too vigorous) and Geranium himalayense ‘Gravetye’. We have added 100 Geranium ‘Mavis Simpson’ around the sunnier side of the outer ring and another 100 Geranium phaeum ‘Samobor’ along the slightly shadier side. Next, along some of the edges of the inner beds we planted 140 Lavandula angustifolia ‘Twickle Purple’. This pretty dwarf English Lavender is also heavily scented which only adds another string to its botanical bow.

Here are some of the new edging plants sitting securely in our quarantine area...

Here are some of the new edging plants sitting securely in our quarantine area…

...and here are the lavenders ready to be transported to the Rose Garden.  Some of you might be pleased to know that 140 10cm pots of lavender fit exactly into the back of our electric buggy!

…and here are the lavenders ready to be transported to the Rose Garden. Some of you might be pleased to know that 140 10cm pots of lavender fit exactly into the back of our electric buggy!

The new plants were then laid out at the correct spacing for the border length...

The new plants were then laid out at the correct spacing for the border length…

...before teams of volunteers got stuck in to the actual planting

…before teams of volunteers got stuck in to the actual planting

340 empty pots later, the job was finished!

340 empty pots later, the job was finished!

We have also just ordered over 180 new rose plants for the Rose Garden. Some of the older plants are past their best and need replacing while in other beds there are gaps that need filling to really pack the place with colour and scent. We have chosen old rose varieties that would have been available to the Messel family during their time here at Nymans but that also either repeat flower or display continuous flowering. We have also made sure that they are scented and that they offer some disease resistance too. A recent historical report has also revealed that yellow roses have no historical significance at Nymans, so although we won’t be removing the existing yellow-flowering plants, we won’t be introducing any more. Virtually every other colour of rose should be catered for though! These new plants will be planted over the dormant season and will hopefully be putting on their first show next Summer.

One of the new varieties, Rosa 'Gruss an Anchen' This aptly German rose was introduced in 1909, repeats well and has a sweet fragrance

One of the new varieties, Rosa ‘Gruss an Anchen’
This aptly German rose was introduced in 1909, repeats well and has a sweet fragrance

The other aspects of rose care that are currently taking up our time here in the garden at Nymans include wind rock pruning and tieing in our climbing roses. We will be shortening the stems of tall bush roses to stop the plants being battered during Winter gales, as this can loosen and damage the roots. Although not essential at this stage because the ‘proper’ pruning will be done in February time, it is best to try to cut the stems just above an outward-facing bud wherever possible. It is also a good idea to thin out the heads of standard roses as their rounded lollipop heads can catch the wind and even snap off completely in a severe storm. Climbing roses can be pruned at any time from now until the end of Winter, ideally cutting out the really old stems and training in new shoots to replace them. If you can train the newer shoots to be as horizontal as possible, that will stress the plant (in a good way!), encouraging it to produce more blooms. Just make sure the end of the stem isn’t lower than where it originated from or you will experience die-back. It’s also a good opportunity to remove the 3 D’s too: dead, diseased and damaged wood. Finish by shortening side shoots by about two-thirds. It is these shoots that will provide next year’s blooms. Finally, it is also very important to collect fallen leaves from around roses to reduce the risk of fungal diseases such as black spot carrying over to next season via spores that will re-infect via rain splash.

Spot the difference!

Spot the difference!

Before I finish, here’s an interesting rose fact for you. Did you know that there is no such thing as a rose with thorns? This is because, botanically speaking, roses have prickles and not thorns. Thorns are modified branches or stems, whereas prickles are extensions of the cortex and epidermis and are comparable to hairs. So, that big hit song that American rock band Poison had with ‘Every Rose Has Its Thorn’ was a complete lie! Whether you like that song or not, make sure you come and visit us here at Nymans again soon and keep a check on our progress as we continue the development and improvement of our Rose Garden. Of course, there is plenty more to see and do here at all times of the year so to make sure you keep up to date with all that is going on at Nymans, don’t forget you can interact with us on both Twitter and Facebook as well as finding out all the important visitor information via our official website. If you want to be alerted by email when each new Nymans Garden Blog is published, simple click the ‘Follow’ button at the top of this page and carry out the instructions.

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Awesome Autumn!

Acer + Hydrangea = Nymans in Autumn

Acer + Hydrangea = Nymans in Autumn

Nymans is often referred to as a garden for all seasons, but for many of our vistors and indeed members of the garden team, Autumn is perhaps the favourite of them all. The showy blooms of Summer may well have faded into memory but the kaleidoscope of colour at this time of year never ceases to dazzle and excite. Whether it’s the fiery foliage tones or the beautiful fruits that adorn the trees that you’re after, Nymans should certainly be top of your list of places to visit soon. In this week’s blog we’ll take you through some of the highlights that await you…

The view from the formal gardens to the Arboretum

The view from the formal gardens to the Arboretum

And here it is in some more detail

And here it is in some more detail

Perhaps the most obvious place to start looking for turning leaf colour is in our Arboretum and even if you can’t make the journey through there, you can still take most of it in from the Prospect look-out which the Messel family designed for just such a thing. The deeper you get into this part of the estate the more examples of leaf colour you’ll find but one of the feature trees there at the moment is this beauty:

Carya ovata Also known as the Shagbark Hickory, the golden leaves on this tree are stunning...

Carya ovata
Also known as the Shagbark Hickory, the golden leaves on this tree are stunning…

...and they look just as attractive as their make their transition from green to yellow

…and they look just as attractive as their make their transition from green to yellow

Before we really get stuck in to some of the amazing Autumn leaf colour here at Nymans, it is worth taking a minute to find out why the leaves of trees all over the World turn from green to shades of yellow, orange and red each year. Plants make food to grow via photosynthesis, converting carbon dioxide and water into sugars using the energy in sunlight. This energy is captured by a green pigment in the leaves and stems of the plant, called chlorophyll. In Winter, with less sunlight, chlorophyll is not produced, but still remaining is the crucial chemical pigment behind leaves turning yellow – carotene. Also the main pigment in carrots, this yellow pigment is always present in the leaves but it isn’t visible until the production of chlorophyll slows in Autumn. Low temperatures also destroy chlorophyll so cold nights quicken the yellowing of leaves. As a tree prepares to shed its leaves in preparation for Winter, a layer of cells form across the base of each leaf stalk which restricts the movement of sugars back into the body of the tree. Concentrated in the leaf, sugars react with proteins in the cell sap to produce anthocyanin, a purply red pigment. It is the combination therefore of carotene and anthocyanain that produces the wonderful colours that we see on our trees every year.

Carotene is clearly the dominant pigment in the leaves of this Carya cordiformis (or Bitternut Hickory)...

Carotene is clearly the dominant pigment in the leaves of this Carya cordiformis (or Bitternut Hickory)…

..and it also looks absolutely stunning against the bright blue Sussex sky!

..and it also looks absolutely stunning against the bright blue Sussex sky!

They say that a picture speaks a thousand words so it’s probably best if I shut up for a moment and let our foliage photographs do the talking! Click on any of the images in this blog for a bigger better view…

This Euonymus alatus near the Prospect is covered in pinky purple leaves...

This Euonymus alatus (Winged Spindle bush) near the Prospect is covered in pinky purple leaves…

...while this Cornus controversa at the other end of the garden near the entrance, is slowly turning a lovely orange colour

…while this Cornus controversa (aka the Wedding Cake Tree) at the other end of the garden near the entrance, is slowly turning a lovely orange colour

This Rhus typhina near the Quarry Pit also has interesting furry stems

This Rhus typhina, also known as the Staghorn Sumac, can be found near the Quarry Pit and also has interesting furry stems

One of the classic trees for Autumn foliage colour is the Liquidambar styraciflua, or Sweet Gum tree

One of the classic trees for Autumn foliage colour is the Liquidambar styraciflua, or Sweet Gum tree

And this Parrotia persica, commonly known as the Persian Ironwood, isn't too shabby either!

And this Parrotia persica, commonly known as the Persian Ironwood, isn’t too shabby either!

You can't go too far wrong with an Acer tree when it comes to Autumn.  This Acer palmatum 'Sango-kaku' in the Pinetum for example, is one of the first to do its thing

You can’t go too far wrong with an Acer tree when it comes to Autumn leaf colour. This Acer palmatum ‘Sango-kaku’ in the Pinetum for example, is one of the first to do its thing

Also in the Pinetum, this Acer palmatum 'Akegarsu' has pure blood red leaves...

Also in the Pinetum, this A. palmatum ‘Akegarsu’ has pure blood red leaves…

...while our 'Bloodgood' Acer adds red winged seed pods to the mix

…while our ‘Bloodgood’ Acer adds red winged seed pods to the mix

In the Top Garden, this Acer japonicum 'Aconitifolium', or Full Moon Acer, looks great no matter which angle you view it from!

In the Top Garden, this A. japonicum ‘Aconitifolium’, or Full Moon Acer, looks great no matter which angle you view it from!

Down in the Rock Garden meanwhile, A. palmatum Dissectum Group, in the right light looks like it might be on fire!

Down in the Rock Garden meanwhile, A. palmatum Dissectum Group, in the right light looks like it might be on fire!

Enkianthus are another great group of plants to check out at this time of the year.  Like most Acers this E. perulatus is also native to Japan

Enkianthus are another great group of plants to check out at this time of the year. Like most Acers, this E. perulatus from the Heather Garden is also native to Japan

While as the name suggests, Enkianthus chinensis hails from from another area of Asia!

While as the name suggests, Enkianthus chinensis hails from from another area of Asia!

Leaves don't have to stay on their trees to look good either.  This thick carpet of Acer and Tulip Tree leaves has an Autumnal charm of its own too

Leaves don’t have to stay on their trees to look good either. This thick carpet of Acer and Tulip Tree leaves has an Autumnal charm of its own too

It’s not all just about the foliage however here in the Nymans gardens in the Autumn. After many of our plants have spent all Summer happily flowering away, if they’re pollinated, those flowers soon produce fruits and seed pods in a wide variety of shapes and colours. Perhaps not as easy to spot as a tree covered in brightly coloured leaves, these beautiful berries and fantastic fruits are well worth seeking out however. Here are some of the picks of the bunch…

This Sorbus 'Leonard Messel' is obviously a very important tree here at Nymans, as it is named after the son of the original owner Ludwig Messel

This Sorbus ‘Leonard Messel’ is obviously a very important tree here at Nymans, as it is named after the son of the original owner Ludwig Messel. You can find it near the Prospect

Judging by the berries alone, you might think this is another Sorbus, or Mountain Ash.  This pale yellow berries belong to a Stranvaesia davidiana 'Fruto Luteo'.  This is actually a type of Photinia and is sometimes referred to as the Christmas Berry.  See if you can spot it along Winter Walk

Judging by the berries alone, you might think this is another Sorbus, or Mountain Ash. These pale yellow berries belong to our Stranvaesia davidiana ‘Fruto Luteo’ however. This is actually a type of Photinia and is sometimes referred to as the Christmas Berry. See if you can spot it along Winter Walk

If pink or yellow berries aren't you're thing, how about the orange fruits on this Cotoneaster franchetii var sternianus?

If pink or yellow berries aren’t you’re thing, how about the orange fruits on this Cotoneaster franchetii var sternianus?

If you head to Holly Corner at the far end of the gardens you'll see many varieties of holly.  Some aren't ftuiting yet but this Ilex aquifolium 'Aurifodinia' is clearly ahead of the game!

If you head to Holly Corner at the far end of the gardens you’ll see many varieties of holly. Some aren’t fruiting yet but this variegated Ilex aquifolium ‘Aurifodinia’ is clearly ahead of the game!

In the Top Garden behind the June Borders, you 'll find this Berberis wilsoniae shrub.  The berries are successionally turning from white...

In the Top Garden behind the June Borders, you ‘ll find this Berberis wilsoniae shrub. Native to China, its berries are successionally turning from white…

...through coral pink...

…through coral pink…

...to a deep pink, almost red colour

…to a deep pink, almost red colour

Perhaps some of the more unusual Autumn fruit here at Nymans, these Euonymus grandiflorus f. salicifolius are very photogenic so make sure you bring your camera!

Perhaps some of the more unusual Autumn fruit here at Nymans, these Euonymus grandiflorus f. salicifolius seed pods are very photogenic so make sure you bring your camera!

Anyone who read our blog from a couple of weeks ago on the Magnolia sargentiana var. robusta tree near the Tennis Lawn could be forgiven for thinking that perhaps that tree would win the award for most interesting Autumn fruit here at Nymans. Well, we think we might have found a contender for the crown and it’s another Magnolia:

Magnolia hypoleuca

Magnolia hypoleuca

What do you reckon? Also often called Magnolia obovata and commonly referred to as the Japanese Bigleaf or Japanese Whitebark, this tree is heavily associated with the Kurile Islands off Japan where it was first discovered. Earlier in the year you would have seen it covered in large creamy, scented flowers that can reach up to 20cm in diameter. Even at this time of the year though there are still plenty of other flowers to feast your eyes on here, as this last set of photos only goes to show…

Persicaria affinis 'Superba' combines blooms with colour leaves and is also a big hit with the bees too

Persicaria affinis ‘Superba’ combines pretty blooms with mesmerising leaf colour and is also a big hit with the bees too!

Surprisingly some of our Rhododendrons have decided to flower again, such as this rare R. cerasinum.  Originally from Tibet, it was first described in 1931

Surprisingly some of our Rhododendrons have decided to flower again, such as this rare R. cerasinum. Originally from Tibet, it was first described in 1931. We are obviously hoping that a second flowering this year won’t affect the blooms for next year

There is still time to catch these Hesperantha flowers in the Rock Garden...

There is still time to catch these Hesperantha flowers in the Rock Garden…

...which is also where you'll find this Daphne transatlantica bush

…which is also where you’ll find this Daphne transatlantica bush

Autumn crocuses are also beginning to pop up everywhere...

Autumn crocuses are also beginning to pop up everywhere…

...and as long as the frosts hold off you'll still be able to see plenty of Salvias, Dahlias and Fuchsias like this 'Voltaire' variety

…and as long as the frosts hold off you’ll still be able to see plenty of Salvias, Dahlias and Fuchsias like this ‘Voltaire’ variety which can be found near the Forecourt

Hopefully this little picture show has whetted your appetite to come and see the Autumn extravaganza here at Nymans for yourself very soon. As the weather appears to be staying mild for a while, now is the perfect time to snap a few pictures of your own too. Of course, there is plenty more to see and do here at all times of the year so to make sure you keep up to date with all that is going on at Nymans, don’t forget you can interact with us on both Twitter and Facebook as well as finding out all the important visitor information via our official website. If you want to be alerted by email when each new Nymans Garden Blog is published, simple click the ‘Follow’ button at the top of this page and carry out the instructions.

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